It used to be that if you wanted to drink good wine you only had a few choices: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, Napa, etc. Not so anymore. We have access to great wines from all over the world. These days, sommelier’s are always on the look-out for the new and different; something that will ‘wow’ the customer. So, Bordeaux has become pedestrian in a lot of somm’s eyes. That’s a shame because these are still some of the most exciting wines on the planet. Let’s look at Bordeaux and see if we can dispel some of these generalizations.

Bordeaux is one of, if not the most, well-known wine region in the world. But it’s suffering from an identity crisis as of late. The region has fallen out of favor with a large swath of the wine drinking public for many reasons. First and foremost is its’ image as a stuffy wine region with its’ grand Chateaus and hefty price tags. Not only that, we’re told that we need to wait a decade or so to truly understand and appreciate the wines. Some say it’s also too confusing with all its appellations and talk of Right Bank vs Left Bank. Oh, and they don’t put the name of the grape on the label. Lots of reason to shy away from Bordeaux but you need not as there is a lot of great wine being made at very reasonable prices.
First off, most Bordeaux is very reasonably priced. By this, I mean that there is a lot of really good wine in the $12-$20 range, but you have to look hard. How can this be when all we read about is the greedy Chateau owners raising prices year after year? Yes, this is a fact. There are greedy Chateau owners who raise prices, even in not so good vintages. But these are just a small fraction of the 10,000 producers or so in the region. You read that correctly, 10,000 producers, give or take a few hundred. Only the top Chateau in the Classifications can get away with raising prices every year. They do so because they are fairly certain that their wines will sell as the demand is usually greater than the supply for the top wines. There’s also the way in which the top Chateau sell their wines that buoys prices. It’s called ‘en primeur’ and it’s taken a big hit lately with some Chateau dropping out altogether. Only the top couple of hundred Chateau participate in en primeur. The rest sell their wines through the classic distribution channels and the supply far out strips the demand for these properties. In fact, every year more and more of the lesser Chateau are on the verge of bankruptcy because there is just too much wine flowing out of Bordeaux and they can’t charge enough to cover their costs.

Why are Bordeaux wines shunned these days? Classic things, like cars, planes, boats and wine are called classic because, well, they’re classic. They’ve stood the test of time. The classics have put their time in and others are compared to them, not the other way around. Bordeaux is a classic wine region as is Burgundy, Barolo, Chianti, Champagne and others. Wine fads will come and go but the classics will remain. There is no shame in professing your love for Bordeaux regardless of what others think. And there is just something special about opening a bottle of these Cabernet and Merlot blends with their dark black fruits, cedar, tobacco and a touch of oak along with firm tannins on its medium bodied frame. Bordeaux is rarely as extracted as Napa Cabs and their weight makes you want to take another sip. They are also great food wines. And, no, you do not have to wait years to enjoy them. Look to the larger appellations on the label such as Bordeaux, Medoc, Haut-Medoc and Graves for wines that are ready upon release. Sure, the top wines reward cellaring but most Chateau also make a second and sometimes a third wine from the younger vines or the not so good blocks. These are often wines meant for immediate consumption or can be cellared for a few years. They are also great bargains.

Finally, Bordeaux does not have to be confusing, as long as you know your banks. The wines of Bordeaux are almost always blends of different grapes with either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot dominating. The Right Bank of the Gironde Estuary is home to Merlot dominated wines such as Pomerol, St. Emilion and Fronsac. The Left Bank is home to Cabernet based wines such as Medoc, Graves, St. Julien and Margaux. These are the names you’ll see on the labels. Of course, there are always exceptions to the rules when it comes to grape variety and blends. If you have a wine that is labeled Bordeaux or Bordeaux Superieur, chances are it is Merlot based and comes from the Entre-Deux-Mers region of Bordeaux. Another labelling term to look for is Cru Bourgeois. These are some of the best value wines in the region and most are consistently good year after year. The whites of the region are now usually Sauvignon Blanc based with some Semillon added for complexity.
Vintage is very important in Bordeaux. A big reason is the region’s proximity to the Atlantic. It gets wet here. The season can be bookended by frost, summer storms are a problem and there is lots of cloud cover which tends to interrupt photosynthesis. Therefore, ripening can be tricky. Once upon a time in Bordeaux each decade would have 3 great vintages, 3 bad vintages and 4 average vintages. Now, if you believe the Chateau owners, almost every year is the next vintage of the century. Some of the recent vintages to look for are 2000, 2001, 2005, 2007 (considered not so great but they are drinking really well), 2009 and the fantastic 2010, 2012-15 are all good as well.

So, grab a bottle of Bordeaux and experience a truly classic wine region. Below are two wines to try.

2010 Chateau La Rose Chatain Lalande de Pomerol, Bordeaux

This, absolutely delicious, wine comes from the Lalande de Pomerol appellation on the right bank. Lalande de Pomerol appellation lies right next to the smaller and more prestigious Pomerol appellation. The wines of both are Merlot based but there is one significant difference. Lalande is larger both in terms of acreage and production. So, there are more bargains to be had. The property is in the hands of Martine Riviere. Her grandfather established the Chateau in 1912.
This is a blend of Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. It is drinking beautifully now. The wine, from a great vintage, is at its’ peak and will remain there for several more years. The nose is full of stewed fruits, cassis, underbrush, tobacco and leather. The palate is fresh with bright acidity and firm, ripe tannins. This shows a restrained power along with and elegant finesse on the finish.

2015 Chateau Les Grandes Mottes, Cotes de Bordeaux-Blaye, Bordeaux Superieur

 

This comes from the Right Bank but is 80% Cabernet Sauvignon with 20% Merlot. See, I said there were exceptions to the rules. It also come from what they call the ‘Cotes’. There are a series of appellations with the word ‘Cotes’ in them because they are all on the banks of the rivers. They are great values and often overlo

oked here in the US. This is young but is approachable with fully-ripened raspberries, cassis and cherry. Just a touch of oak to go along with mineral notes and dried eucalyptus all lead to a long finish.

 

It’s that time of year again in Burlington, in just two short weeks the streets fill with gold, green and purple and the community comes together for three full days of fun and philanthropy! The Baker family is excited to once again be participating in this amazing event and we are so proud of our friends over at Magic Hat for putting this on. All events over Mardi Gras weekend will serve to bring awareness and support to the Vermont Foodbank. Over the years, Magic Hat Mardi Gras weekend has raised more than $250,000 for the Vermont community and this year will be the 22nd anniversary of the event. 

Mardi-Gras-IIIPhoto from VT Foodbank Website

Aside from great beer and great company this event offers a number of events including live music, a parade, food trucks, the fun run and more. This year the event will feature two special guests Steve Lemme and Kevin Heffernan of Super Troopers. For a full list of activities and details click here. 

Mardi-Gras-VIPhoto from VT Foodbank Website

We at Baker pride ourselves on being members of the Vermont community for the past 52 years and it is events like this that remind us just how lucky we are to live and do business here.


About The Vermont Foodbank

The mission of the Vermont Foodbank is to gather and share quality food and nurture partnerships so that no one in Vermont will go hungry. Three locations throughout the state including Barre, Brattleboro and Rutland, help to feed the 1 in 4 Vermonters who are struggling with hunger. Last year’s Mardi Gras celebration raised enough funds to provide over 50,000 meals for our neighbors in need.

Volunteer to help with the parade and sell beads, sign up for the Fun Run, or buy some stylish Mardi Gras beads.

 

The Baker Distributing family will be showing their VT pride at the Lake Champlain Pond Hockey Classic this weekend! Presented by Labatt Blue – this event is tailored to it’s participants starting with the tournament all the way down to the after game activities.

We are excited to see our friends at Labatt putting on such an awesome event yet again for the Vermont community and across the country!

 

For more information on this event visit: http://bit.ly/2k3VU87

It’s that time of year again, the snow is beginning to fall, the lights are on the tree and in just a few short weeks friends and family will be gathering to celebrate for the holidays. That’s why at Baker we are running our Nor’Easter Wine Spectacular – because are you really ringing in the New Year if you don’t cheers with a little glass of bubbly? If you’re shaking your head right now then you see where we’re coming from!

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We have some amazing varieties on sale from Korbel to Mionetto to Chandon and more until the end of December. Pair yours with a fresh cheese plate, decadent dessert or enjoy a glass over dinner with friends and family. Whether you’re into Brut, Prosecco, Rosé, or just a delicious glass a Red – there is something for everyone!


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