It used to be that if you wanted to drink good wine you only had a few choices: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, Napa, etc. Not so anymore. We have access to great wines from all over the world. These days, sommelier’s are always on the look-out for the new and different; something that will ‘wow’ the customer. So, Bordeaux has become pedestrian in a lot of somm’s eyes. That’s a shame because these are still some of the most exciting wines on the planet. Let’s look at Bordeaux and see if we can dispel some of these generalizations.

Bordeaux is one of, if not the most, well-known wine region in the world. But it’s suffering from an identity crisis as of late. The region has fallen out of favor with a large swath of the wine drinking public for many reasons. First and foremost is its’ image as a stuffy wine region with its’ grand Chateaus and hefty price tags. Not only that, we’re told that we need to wait a decade or so to truly understand and appreciate the wines. Some say it’s also too confusing with all its appellations and talk of Right Bank vs Left Bank. Oh, and they don’t put the name of the grape on the label. Lots of reason to shy away from Bordeaux but you need not as there is a lot of great wine being made at very reasonable prices.
First off, most Bordeaux is very reasonably priced. By this, I mean that there is a lot of really good wine in the $12-$20 range, but you have to look hard. How can this be when all we read about is the greedy Chateau owners raising prices year after year? Yes, this is a fact. There are greedy Chateau owners who raise prices, even in not so good vintages. But these are just a small fraction of the 10,000 producers or so in the region. You read that correctly, 10,000 producers, give or take a few hundred. Only the top Chateau in the Classifications can get away with raising prices every year. They do so because they are fairly certain that their wines will sell as the demand is usually greater than the supply for the top wines. There’s also the way in which the top Chateau sell their wines that buoys prices. It’s called ‘en primeur’ and it’s taken a big hit lately with some Chateau dropping out altogether. Only the top couple of hundred Chateau participate in en primeur. The rest sell their wines through the classic distribution channels and the supply far out strips the demand for these properties. In fact, every year more and more of the lesser Chateau are on the verge of bankruptcy because there is just too much wine flowing out of Bordeaux and they can’t charge enough to cover their costs.

Why are Bordeaux wines shunned these days? Classic things, like cars, planes, boats and wine are called classic because, well, they’re classic. They’ve stood the test of time. The classics have put their time in and others are compared to them, not the other way around. Bordeaux is a classic wine region as is Burgundy, Barolo, Chianti, Champagne and others. Wine fads will come and go but the classics will remain. There is no shame in professing your love for Bordeaux regardless of what others think. And there is just something special about opening a bottle of these Cabernet and Merlot blends with their dark black fruits, cedar, tobacco and a touch of oak along with firm tannins on its medium bodied frame. Bordeaux is rarely as extracted as Napa Cabs and their weight makes you want to take another sip. They are also great food wines. And, no, you do not have to wait years to enjoy them. Look to the larger appellations on the label such as Bordeaux, Medoc, Haut-Medoc and Graves for wines that are ready upon release. Sure, the top wines reward cellaring but most Chateau also make a second and sometimes a third wine from the younger vines or the not so good blocks. These are often wines meant for immediate consumption or can be cellared for a few years. They are also great bargains.

Finally, Bordeaux does not have to be confusing, as long as you know your banks. The wines of Bordeaux are almost always blends of different grapes with either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot dominating. The Right Bank of the Gironde Estuary is home to Merlot dominated wines such as Pomerol, St. Emilion and Fronsac. The Left Bank is home to Cabernet based wines such as Medoc, Graves, St. Julien and Margaux. These are the names you’ll see on the labels. Of course, there are always exceptions to the rules when it comes to grape variety and blends. If you have a wine that is labeled Bordeaux or Bordeaux Superieur, chances are it is Merlot based and comes from the Entre-Deux-Mers region of Bordeaux. Another labelling term to look for is Cru Bourgeois. These are some of the best value wines in the region and most are consistently good year after year. The whites of the region are now usually Sauvignon Blanc based with some Semillon added for complexity.
Vintage is very important in Bordeaux. A big reason is the region’s proximity to the Atlantic. It gets wet here. The season can be bookended by frost, summer storms are a problem and there is lots of cloud cover which tends to interrupt photosynthesis. Therefore, ripening can be tricky. Once upon a time in Bordeaux each decade would have 3 great vintages, 3 bad vintages and 4 average vintages. Now, if you believe the Chateau owners, almost every year is the next vintage of the century. Some of the recent vintages to look for are 2000, 2001, 2005, 2007 (considered not so great but they are drinking really well), 2009 and the fantastic 2010, 2012-15 are all good as well.

So, grab a bottle of Bordeaux and experience a truly classic wine region. Below are two wines to try.

2010 Chateau La Rose Chatain Lalande de Pomerol, Bordeaux

This, absolutely delicious, wine comes from the Lalande de Pomerol appellation on the right bank. Lalande de Pomerol appellation lies right next to the smaller and more prestigious Pomerol appellation. The wines of both are Merlot based but there is one significant difference. Lalande is larger both in terms of acreage and production. So, there are more bargains to be had. The property is in the hands of Martine Riviere. Her grandfather established the Chateau in 1912.
This is a blend of Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. It is drinking beautifully now. The wine, from a great vintage, is at its’ peak and will remain there for several more years. The nose is full of stewed fruits, cassis, underbrush, tobacco and leather. The palate is fresh with bright acidity and firm, ripe tannins. This shows a restrained power along with and elegant finesse on the finish.

2015 Chateau Les Grandes Mottes, Cotes de Bordeaux-Blaye, Bordeaux Superieur

 

This comes from the Right Bank but is 80% Cabernet Sauvignon with 20% Merlot. See, I said there were exceptions to the rules. It also come from what they call the ‘Cotes’. There are a series of appellations with the word ‘Cotes’ in them because they are all on the banks of the rivers. They are great values and often overlo

oked here in the US. This is young but is approachable with fully-ripened raspberries, cassis and cherry. Just a touch of oak to go along with mineral notes and dried eucalyptus all lead to a long finish.

 

I get asked this question a lot when the subject of Italian wines comes up. Someone always comes up to me and asks, “So, what’s the deal with Super-Tuscans?”. It’s not as easy to answer this question as you may think. First let’s look at how wines are categorized in Italy and then we’ll see where Super-Tuscans fit in.

Italy adopted the appellation system for wines from France in the 1960’s, about 30 years after France initiated theirs and which all other appellation systems are based on. In France it is called the Appellation d’Origine Controlee or AOC. It is used not only for wines but for cheese, butter and other agricultural products all based on the idea of terroir or place. The origins of the modern French AOC system date back to the early 1400’s when Roquefort cheese was regulated by parliament to protect the name. In essence an AOC is a controlled place-name. In Italy the equivalent is called Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) and Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG).

In order for wines to qualify for the DOC(G) designation the producer must grow, or source, the grapes from the designated geographic region, make the wines in the region and follow strict rules regarding grape variety or varieties, yields, production methods, aging requirements which may include the size and type of vessel, and other things. In addition the wines must pass a blind tasting and chemical analysis before being awarded a seal of approval for the neck of the bottle. Some of these DOC(G)’s are very rigorous and demanding for the producer. This is all done to protect the name and reputation of the DOC(G) and give a wine that shows typicity of the place where it is produced (terroir).

An example wine would be Chianti and Chianti Classico, both DOCG’s. For the wine to be called Chianti it must come from the geographic area designated as Chianti, in the heart of Tuscany. This area has been expanded over the years to accommodate increased production and is now very large. Chianti Classico on the other hand is a smaller, better DOCG which is in the historic heart of the Chianti region. It lies in the hills between Florence and Siena. Both wines must contain Sangiovese. Chianti must contain a minimum of 70% Sangiovese and the balance can be made up of traditional and international red grapes and a 10% maximum of white grapes. The wine can be 100% Sangiovese. Chianti Classico must be made from a minimum of 80% Sangiovese. The producer can then round out the wine with traditional and international red grapes. White grapes are no longer allowed in Chianti Classico and the wine can be 100% Sangiovese. Producers must then follow all the other rules pertaining to yields, alcohol levels, aging, etc. These are just 2 of the over 300 DOC(G) wines in Italy today.

So, what if you are a producer in Tuscany who doesn’t want to follow all the rules and regulations of the DOC(G)? Maybe you are a producer in the Chianti zone but want to make a wine using only international grapes like Cabernet and Merlot. That’s perfectly legal but you cannot call your wine Chianti. It does not adhere to the rules of the DOCG. Or, maybe back in the 1960’s and 70’s, you are on the coast of Tuscany, in no-man’s land, and want to produce a Bordeaux blend. That was, and still is, legal but what did you call your wine? There were no DOC or DOCG wines that these would fall under so your wine was just a table wine or Vino da Tavola. This is where the Super-Tuscan’s come in.

Super-Tuscans came about in the 1960’s and 70’s. They were high-priced, high-quality red wines that did not fit into any of the new official categories or DOC(G)’s. The wines were something not seen before in Italy. They were made with international grapes or non-traditional blends and aged in small, new French oak barrels. The bottles had fancy labels with fantasy or proprietary names. Since these wines did not fit into the DOC(G) system they had to be labeled as lowly table wines or Vino da Tavola. This was considered scandalous due to the high prices these wines were fetching. How could a lowly table wine cost more than a classic DOC(G) wine?! The first of the Super-Tuscans was Tenuta San Guido’s Sassicaia produced in the town of Bolgheri on the Tuscan coast. Tenuta San Guido was established by marchese Mario Incisa della Rocchetta. The wine was first produced in 1948 from Cabernet Sauvignon and intended for the family’s consumption only. In 1968 the machese’s son Nicolò and nephew Piero Antinori convinced him to release it commercially. The first vintage was in 1971. Demand soon skyrocketed and the marchese hired the famous consulting enologist Giacomo Tachis to further refine the wine while production increased. Today the wine is mostly Cabernet Sauvignon with some Cabernet Franc. It is extremely expensive and in very high demand.

The idea behind Sassicaia was to produce a wine that would rival that of Bordeaux from an area that was relatively unknown but had great potential with Bordeaux grapes. Others followed. Since this was a part of Tuscany not covered by any of the newly formed appellations or DOC(G)’s, the wines were labeled as simple Vino da Tavola. But Sassicaia and the other coastal wines were just the beginning. In the early 1970’s a revolution was about to begin in the Chianti Classico region that would turn the appellation on its’ head and change it forever.

At this point in time Chianti was synonymous with mass-produced, watered down versions of the original. Many producers were dissatisfied with the tired, old rules and regulations of the appellation. Back then white grapes were mandatory not only in Chianti but Chianti Classico. The inclusion of international grapes was forbidden as was making a wine solely from Sangiovese. Some producers took matters into their own hands and started to make the wines they wanted to make. Antinori introduced Tignanello and Solaia and others were not far behind. These were all wines based on Bordeaux varieties with or without the addition of Sangiovese. But it wasn’t all about Bordeaux varieties.

In 1981 Sergio Manetti of the Montevertine estate, in the middle of the Chianti Classico region, was fed up. He felt that not only the mandatory addition of white grapes (white grapes are no longer allowed in Chianti Classico) but the addition of international grapes to make a more broadly appealing wine was doing a disservice to the noble Sangiovese. He was to become the champion of Sangiovese. So much so that in 1981 he produced his last vintage of Chianti Classico vowing to never again include any other grapes with his beloved Sangiovese. He produced the first 100% Sangiovese Super-Tuscan under the name Le Pergole Torte from the Montevertine estate 6 miles south of Radda in Chianti. This wine, like the other Super-Tuscans of the day fell out of the DOCG regulations and was labeled a Vino da Tavola. But Sergio didn’t care. Even after Chianti Classico changed the rules to allow a 100% Sangiovese based wine he refused to join the appellation.

The success of the original Super-Tuscans eventually led to major changes in the Chianti and Chianti Classico DOCG’s. No longer were white grapes permitted in Chianti Classico, international grapes were now allowed in limited quantities and a 100% Sangiovese wine was now permitted. It also led to a new category of wine being approved in 1992, Indicazione Geographica Tipica or IGT. This is a category that is less strict than DOC(G). It is the equivalent of France’s Vin de Pays. It provides the winemaker more choice in terms of grapes and production methods. Sassicaia would eventually be awarded its’ own DOC (Sasscicaia Bolgheri) in 1994 and other DOC’s for Super-Tuscans would follow.

Today the term Super-Tuscan is a bit overused and misunderstood. To some, a Super-Tuscan is any wine produced in Tuscany that is not DOC(G). But, as we have seen, some Super-Tuscans are now DOC wines! Super-Tuscans also used to be very expensive but today not all are. There are some that are quite reasonable.

I think what those original Super-Tuscans did was to shake up the establishment and force the governing bodies and producers to take a hard look at the what was going on at the time. Quality was suffering and experimentation was stifled by outdated rules and regulations. Not all these new wines were good and many were criticized for not being typical of Italy. Some producers even abandoned using international grapes and winemaking and returned to more traditional practices. But these ground-breaking wines were instrumental in moving Italian wine from quantity to quality based and today Italy is making better wines than ever.

If you’re a craft beer connoisseur that has traveled out west, chances are you’ve heard of the brewery New Belgium. Its roots are in Fort Collins, CO, where Jeff Lebesch took his Belgian inspired beer recipes and ideas from his travels through Europe, and brought them to life in a basement. The starter beers were the Abbey, an earthy brown ale, and Fat Tire, the amber ale that paved the way for the brewery and to this day is in many tap rooms across US. 

Thanks to the brewery’s expansion into it’s second home in Ashville, North Carolina, it’s been able to extend its distribution. The New Belgium legacy recently carried its tasty brews to New England, and right into the hands of Vermont beer drinkers. We’re excited to be distributing it to some of our favorite local watering holes!

Let’s meet some of the key players:

Fat Tire Belgian White Ale- This iconic ale has been satisfying taste buds ever since New Belgium started brewing it 25 years ago. It got its name from New Belgium’s co-founder’s Belgium countryside “fat tire” bike ride, hence the ale’s belgian roots. 

 

Dayblazer Easygoing Ale- This golden ale starts out with an initial honey sweetness, then rounds out with a subtle bitterness. Just as the name suggests, this beer is easy going at 4.8%. Good thing it comes in 24 oz cans!

 

Citradelic Tangerine IPA- The blend of Citra hops and tangerine peel brings a refreshing, tropical taste to the palate with every sip. This well-balanced brew is perfect for beer drinkers who are looking to change it up. Drink this IPA outside on a sunny day and you won’t be disappointed. 

 

We’re pleased to have Goodwater Brewery joining us for our Baker’s Dozen Pub Crawl this Thursday!

Goodwater Brewery is a 20 BBL brewery and tasting room located in Williston, VT. They began operations in the beginning of 2016, and currently produce a variety of brands in both kegs and cans.

Their current lineup consists of 8 different beers in their tasting room which can be enjoyed in sampler flights, pints, or growlers to go. These include the Hoppy Side of Pale, Stange (kolsch-style ale) and their newest release, Hop Collusion IPA- a deliciously drinkable IPA featuring a blend of Simcoe and Citra hops.

Other beers available in the tasting room include Proper Mild, inspiRED, Not for the faint of Tart, (Flemish sour ale), and current seasonal releases of Sweet Winter Brown and Porter 86.

Be sure to visit their Facebook page for more information about current events and tasting room hours!

Also joining our lineup of 13 brewers for the Baker’s Dozen Pub Crawl is the Boston Beer Company!

The Boston Beer Company began in 1984 with a generations-old family recipe that Founder and Brewer Jim Koch uncovered in his father’s attic. Inspired and unafraid to challenge conventional thinking about beer, Jim brought the recipe to life in his kitchen. Pleased with the results of his work, Jim decided to sample his beer with bars in Boston in the hopes that drinkers would appreciate the complex, full-flavored beer he brewed fresh in America. That beer was aptly named Samuel Adams Boston Lager, in recognition of one of our nation’s great founding fathers, a man of independent mind and spirit. Little did Jim know at the time, Samuel Adams Boston Lager would soon become a catalyst of the American craft beer revolution.

What do they have to offer?

Today, The Boston Beer Company brews more than 60 styles of beer. It relentlessly pursues the development of new styles and the perfection of classic beers by searching the world for the finest ingredients. Using the traditional four vessel brewing process, the Company often takes extra steps like dry-hopping, barrel-aging and a secondary fermentation known as krausening. The Company has also pioneered another revolution, the ‘extreme beer’ movement, where it seeks to challenge drinker’s perceptions of what beer can be.

The Boston Beer Company has been committed to elevating the image of American craft beer by entering festivals and competitions around the globe, and is one of world’s most awarded breweries at international beer competitions. As an independent company, brewing quality beer remains its primary focus. Although Samuel Adams beer is America’s leading craft beer, it accounts for only one percent of the U.S. beer market. The Boston Beer Company will continue its independently-minded quest to brew great beer and to advocate for the growth of craft beer across America.

Key Players:

Boston Lager: After being on the market for over 30 years, this refreshing lager is still a staple within the lineup. It’s a full-flavored beer both robust and rich with character.

Summer Ale: This refreshing American wheat ale is returning to the market for the 21st year, this time with limited edition packaging to compliment summer adventures. It’s crisp, citrusy flavor will keep you coming back for more.

Rebel IPA: This IPA has undergone a few recipe alterations over the years, and now offers an intense, juicy, tropical and citrusy flavor that highlights its unique hop character. It is now only brewed with Samuel Adams special two-row malt blend. It also comes in a variety pack featuring an exclusive lineup of variations including the Rebel Juiced IPA, Rebel Grapefruit IPA and Rebel White Citra IPA.

We’re excited to be adding Brown’s Brewing Co. to our lineup of breweries joining us for the Baker’s Dozen Pub Crawl next Thursday, May 18th.

Back in 1993, before the surge of craft breweries, Garry and Kelly Brown opened a brewpub in then-blighted Troy, NY, more or less to make the beer they wanted to drink. The Browns were undaunted and compelled by a need to share what they made with everyone looking for something new and fresh.

What do they have to offer?

Brown’s Brewing Company has become what it is today through grit and determination with two very popular taprooms, an R&D pilot brewery in Troy, and a full scale production brewery and canning facility in North Hoosick. Distributed in three states, Brown’s cans and draughts are among the most enjoyable and celebrated locally brewed and hand crafted ales and lagers around. Whether you visit the Walloomsac Taproom or the Troy Taproom, you can expect to enjoy delicious beer and food accompanied by a fun atmosphere.

Brown’s Brewing Co. Beer Highlights:Cherry Razz: Tart and sassy like its name, this Amber Ale features a generous amount of whole crushed cherries and raspberries balancing a sweet malt forward character and a slight hop zest. When you need an easy drinking beer, this amber ale is a great choice.

Coast-To-Coast IPA: With a mighty malt backbone, this trend defying IPA balances west coast bitter with east coast juice for an unmistakably drinkable and engaging beer. IPA lovers get the best of both worlds in every sip.

Oatmeal Stout: Engaging, dark, and bold, our ever popular ode to the classic English Stout earned Brown’s the prestigious gold medal at the World Beer Cup but that hasn’t prevented the brewery from refining this defining brew into an approachable easy to drink, rich, and silky smooth glass of pure deliciousness.

Spring Seasonal released in May:

Krüsh Kölsch: Featuring a low ABV and an IBU exactly right for those summer days you never want to see end. Brown’s Krüsh Kölsch is nimble and very easy to drink. Cold conditioned and fermented using a blend of lager and ale yeast, this beer’s complex flavors finish clean and refreshing, beckoning you to keep going.

 

 

Leading up to our Baker’s Dozen Pub Crawl event on May 18th, we’ll be introducing you to some of the breweries that will be joining us! First up is Ithaca Beer Co.

Nestled in the heart of New York’s beautiful Finger Lakes Region, Ithaca Beer Company demonstrates its pride by brewing world-class craft beer inspired by its home. At Ithaca Beer, they are driven to reflect the culture, creativity, and diversity of the area in everything they do. From their complex and innovative beers to the local fare served in our lively Taproom brewpub – their unwavering attention to detail and passion for their community and our craft is unmistakable.

What does their tasting room have to offer?

In addition to year-round favorites like our popular Flower Power IPA, you can also choose from new five barrel beers, a special Thursday night cask, and seasonal selections on rotation. Enjoy dining indoors, soaking up the scenery on our patio, or relaxing on the lawn in the warmer months. We are also pleased to offer brewery tours on weekends and by reservation, giving our customers a behind-the-scenes look at our facilities. It’s easy to get in the spirit, at Ithaca Beer!

Ithaca Beer Co. Highlights:

Flower Power IPA: Enjoy the clover honey hue and tropical nose. Simultaneously Punchy and soothing with a big body and a finish that boasts pineapple and grapefruit. Flower power is hopped and dry-hopped five different times throughout the brewing and fermentation process.

 

Happy Pils: Brilliantly clear and refreshing, this German Pilsner boasts a healthy amount of spicy noble Germans hops, and a dynamic, yet restrained malt backbone. Our Happy Pils is bound to bring a smile to any craft beer lover’s face.


May Xipaa “Alexir”: The Alexir is an exuberant New England IPA with a generous and unique pairing of Citra, Chinook, and Simcoe hops throughout the boil, whirlpool and double dry hop additions. This Spring potion balances malt sweetness with a confident thirst quenching mouthfeel. Golden in color while hazier than previous XIPPA!s. You’ll find the bold character of big pineapple, fresh citrus and tropical fruit makes this entry a perfect hoppy tonic for May afternoons and evenings – indoors or out, standing or sitting. For added intrigue, the discerning drinker will enjoy a small amount of Pacific Jade that brings in a small element of citrusy zest, pepper and funk.

Baker Distributing is excited to announce we’re teaming up with the Burlington Firefighter’s Association (BFFA) Local 3044 to aid in their efforts to raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. For every person who attends our upcoming first annual Baker’s Dozen Pub Crawl on May 18th, Baker Distributing is donating $10 to the cause. Here’s a little more information about our fundraising partner, the BFFA.

The Burlington Firefighter’s Association (BFFA) is a collection of just under 60 Burlington Firefighter/EMT’s, Lieutenants, and Captains that operate under the Local chapter (L3044) of the International Association of Fire Fighters. The BFFA serves as both the labor union body that represents Burlington’s line firefighters and officers with management and City Administration as well as the collective outlet for Burlington Firefighters to give back to the community they serve.

Burlington’s Firefighters and EMT/medics protect the Queen City 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and it is the BFFA that has made sure the men and women on the job have fair pay and benefits as well as a safe work environment.  The BFFA also serves the men and women on the job during their times of struggle; be it financial support during periods of injury or illness, long term support to a member’s family upon a line-of-duty death, or periods of emotional support to cope with the scars we bear during our careers.

The BFFA also acts as the path for Burlington Firefighters to give back the the city they call a second home.  Every year, the BFFA hosts, or participates in, events that raise money for charitable organizations:  A scenic train ride fundraiser for the Ronald McDonald House, a Fill-the-Boot and Hero Run 5k to support the MDA, and Operation FireCuff’s to collect toys for the Vermont Children’s Hospital during the holiday season.  This year they also embark on a new venture, a joint effort with Baker’s Distributing to raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

The BFFA has a long and dynamic history of protecting and supporting the men and women of the Burlington Fire Department while also giving back to the city we know and love. Our Baker Distributing team is excited to join forces to engage with the community, celebrate craft beer and raise money for such a great cause!

With summer just around the corner, we’re already compiling the tasty drink recipes we want to try out while soaking up some sun. Luckily our friends over at Polar Seltzer have given us plenty of material to work with.

One in particular we can’t wait to try is Very Berry Punch. This recipe is great because it gives you the right portions of the ingredients to start with, and from there you can get creative with the flavors and fruits you want to add. It makes for a fun project to enjoy with the kids and the perfect beverage to serve at a family BBQ!

With the wide array of Polar Seltzer flavors available, we’re already picturing the endless array of combinations we can come up with. Strawberry-watermelon perhaps? Or maybe even pomegranate-lime. Oh the possibilities. Whatever flavors you choose, we hope you enjoy every sip!

There is no better way to welcome Spring than with the flavors of refreshing Vermont craft brews that perfectly highlight the season. What do our Baker Distributing brewers have in store? Let’s take a look at the brews you won’t want to miss out on.

singlechairMagic Hat: Single Chair Golden Ale– We like to think this easy drinking ale is best enjoyed in the sun, or after a long day on the slopes. Why just a single chair you may ask? It commemorates the single chair lift that resides at Mad River, one of only two in the country. As stated on Magic Hat’s website, “As winter’s cover melts to reveal spring’s hidden life, take a ride to the topon the Single Chair and celebrate your independent spirit.”

CitraMantra-6pack

Otter Creek- Citra Mantra IPL– This refreshing India Pils Lager is single-hopped with Citra hops. The flavor is highlighted by Pilsner, Munich and Vienna malts that give it a crisp tropical and citrus finish. At 5.75%, this IPL makes for smooth sipping.

 

Switchback- Smoked Märzen- If you like a balanced and hoppy brew that helps you welcome the sites and sounds of spring, this Rauch Bier style Märzen does the trick. With it’s unique smokey flavor from Munich malt, and a touch of bitterness from German Magnum hops and Vanguard hops, you’ll be enjoying every sip of smokey deliciousness. Available in 22oz bottles and in the tap room.

switchback

Switchback- Citra-Pils Keller Bier– Now available year-round, this is another great beer to reach for when you need a light and drinkable brew. It’s citrusy flavor combines characteristics of both a pilsner and IPA, presenting the palate with a unique spin on the typical lager style beer. The key to it’s flavor comes from dry hopping the beer with both Citra and Saaz hops. Expect a touch of lemony flavor on the palate to give it a delightfully refreshing taste. Available in 12oz bottles and in the tap room.

Screen Shot 2017-04-13 at 8.30.21 AMGoodwater- Hoppy Side of Pale– If you like pale ales and you like IPAs, you’ll definitely love a beer that combines the best of both beers. The preliminary flavors of this beer indicate the smooth notes of a full bodied pale ale. Once it lingers longer, you then get a slightly hoppy finish. With these complex flavors to enjoy, you’ll certainly be hopping over to Goodwater for another taste.

 

 

These are just a few reasons to celebrate the long anticipated arrival of spring. It’s time to get outside for some adventure! Whether you sip your next beer from the top of a mountain, at the bottom of the slopes, or simply outside in your yard while grilling with friends, we hope you enjoy every second!

 


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